Featured Student: Cindy Minarova-Banjac

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Confucianism in the Chinese World Order:
From Madam Harmony to Mr Science
by Bachelor of International Relations student Cindy Minarova-Banjac

CindyConfucianism strongly influenced pre-modern Chinese political thought and society. According to Tongdong, political thought in traditional China flourished under the Spring and Autumn and Warring States periods (SAWS, 770-222 BCE). It was during this time that the feudalistic, pyramid-like structure of the Zhou was beginning to collapse due to the overexpansion of the empire (Tongdong, 2012). In addition to the pre-modern emergence of independent Westphalian-like principalities, this period was also characterized by a rich source of statecraft known as the ‘Contention of One Hundred Schools of Thought’. This, according to Bell, referred to the growing influence of the major philosophical schools of thought that were led by the Pre-Qin masters (Bell, 2008). The most famous of these masters was Confucius or Kong Zi (551-479BCE), the founder of Confucianism. As Confucius notes, one of the most pressing issues that he and his followers tried to address was the issue of modernity: “I transmit but do not innovate; and I believe in and love antiquity” (Legge, 2012). However, instead of advocating a return to the earlier “Golden Age of Zhou” (Murphey, 2008, p. 40), Confucius responded to his external environment and innovated a quasi-religious system by reviving old knowledge that was relevant to his time….READ MORE

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